Kashmir : The Forgotten Conflict – Aljazeera Timeline of the Kashmir Conflict

All that has been published in Aljazeera on the Kashmir Conflict.


Kashmiris’ Pain Over Unmarked Graves – BBC

Thousands of unmarked graves have been discovered in remote areas of Indian-administered Kashmir, a legacy of decades of conflict in the region. Now a government human rights body is calling on the Indian authorities to investigate the graves – to identify the dead and find out who killed them.

Khurram Parvez works for the Coalition of Civil Society, a human rights organisation which first drew attention to the unmarked graves and is demanding a full, impartial investigation.


The London Riots in Dramatic Pictures

Fire fighters and riot police survey the area as fire rages through a building in Tottenham, north London on Aug. 7, 2011. A demonstration against the death of a local man turned violent and cars and shops were set ablaze. (Lewis Whyld/PA/AP)

 

 

A policeman walks past the charred remains of the Reeves furniture store in Croydon on August 9, 2011, following a third night of violence on the streets of London. (Andrew Cowie/AFP/Getty Images) #

 


Why is London Burning? Laurie Penny a 24-year-old author and blogger from London reflects on the roots of the unrest.

Tonight in London, social order and the rule of law have broken down entirely. The city has been brought to a standstill; it is not safe to go out onto the streets, and where I am in Holloway, the violence is coming closer. As I write, the looting and arson attacks have spread to at least fifty different areas across the UK, including dozens in London, and communities are now turning on each other, with the Guardian reporting on rival gangs forming battle lines. It has become clear to the disenfranchised young people of Britain, who feel that they have no stake in society and nothing to lose, that they can do what they like tonight, and the police are utterly unable to stop them. That is what riots are all about.

The violence on the streets is being dismissed as “pure criminality”, as the work of a “violent minority”, as “opportunism”. This is madly insufficient. It is no way to talk about viral civil unrest. Angry young people with nothing to do and little to lose are turning on their own communities, and they cannot be stopped, and they know it. Tonight, in one of the greatest cities in the world, society is ripping itself apart.

Violence is rarely mindless. The politics of a burning building, a smashed-in shop or a young man shot by police may be obscured even to those who lit the rags or fired the gun, but the politics are there. Unquestionably there is far, far more to these riots than the death of Mark Duggan, whose shooting sparked off the unrest on Saturday when two police cars were set alight after a five-hour vigil at Tottenham police station.

A peaceful protest over the death of a man at police hands, in a community where locals have been given every reason to mistrust the forces of law and order, is one sort of political statement. Raiding shops for technology and trainers that cost ten times as much as the benefits you’re no longer entitled to is another. A co-ordinated, viral wave of civil unrest across the poorest boroughs of Britain, with young people coming from across the capital and the country to battle the police, is another.


BlackBerry Messenger Instrumental in Spreading and Coordinating Riots and Looting in London

The quick spread of the riots and violence in London over the last few days seem to have taken Britain by surprise. Not enough police were on the streets; the prime minister did not come back into town until two days of violence rocked the city; and, Monday night, the violence spread to cities beyond London.

It seems the rioters had a key assist from a technology not often making headlines: BlackBerry Messenger (or BBM for short). It’s put Blackberry at the center of the riots, with a London MP asking the company to turn off the technology to calm the chaos and a hacking group infiltrating the Blackberry site threatening riots at the Blackberry headquarters if the company releases any BBMs to the police.

While Twitter and Facebook have gotten the lion’s share of attention in helping to fuel protests in the Middle East, the public nature of those sites has kept most Londoners away from the open networks. The Guardian reports that many of the rioters organized on the private messaging system BBM, which allows for a group text messaging to be sent to people within a chosen network.

One such message shown to the Guardian read: “Everyone from all sides of London meet up at the heart of London (central) OXFORD CIRCUS!!, Bare SHOPS are gonna get smashed up so come get some (free stuff!!!) f*** the feds we will send them back with OUR riot! >:O Dead the ends and colour war for now so if you see a brother… SALUT! if you see a fed… SHOOT!”


Riots and Looting Spreads from London. Engulfs Other Cities.

The riots which were sparked off by the shooting down of Mark Duggan in Tottenham, London by the police on Thursday, Aug 4 have spread across the city and then to other cities in UK. The spate of riots and looting has pushed UK into a major law & order crisis the law enforcement agencies and the government are struggling to bring to an end.

Click the button on right to follow live updates from the Guardian

Click the button on right to follow live updates from The Telegraph.  

Click the button on right to see map of locations of incidents.